Reading Comprehension Quiz


Use the dictionary, the acronym finder, and the word origins dictionary (links above) as needed. A new quiz is available each Monday through Thursday. This is the quiz for June 9.


In 1955, Montgomery, Alabama's segregation laws were complex. Blacks were required to pay their fare to the driver and then get off and reboard through the back door. Sometimes, the bus would drive off before the paid-up customers made it to the back entrance. If the white section was full and another white customer entered, blacks were required to give up their seats and move farther to the back. A black person was not even allowed to sit across the aisle from whites.

These humiliations were compounded by the fact that two-thirds of the bus riders in Montgomery were black.

One December evening, a woman left work and boarded a bus for home. She was tired; her feet ached. But this was Montgomery, Ala., in 1955, and, as the bus became crowded, the woman, a black woman, was ordered to give up her seat to a white passenger. When she remained seated, that simple decision eventually led to the disintegration of institutionalized segregation in the South, ushering in a new era of the civil rights movement. This woman was Rosa Parks.

1. The Latin word origin of segregation means
A. divide.
B. put into a different area.
C. separate from the flock.
D. insult.
2. Bus riders in 1955 in Montgomery were
A. mostly white.
B. mostly black.
C. 50-50.
D. entirely black.
3. Rosa Parks is remembered because
A. she started a protest movement.
B. she was a woman of courage.
C. she remained seated.
D. she was a black woman.
4. Institutionalized in this context means
A. put into an institution.
B. incorporated into a structured system.
C. the Southern way.
D. hopeless.


The information comes from an article by Rita Dove at Time Magazine Most Important People of the Century.

Write down your answers and then see Answer Key below.


























Answer Key: 1-C..........2-B..........3-A..........4-B
Corrections? Questions? Comments? E-mail Robert Jackson at robert15115@gmail.com.