Reading Comprehension Quiz


[A new interlinear poem will be available each Monday: Weekly Interlinear Poem .]

Use the dictionary, the acronym finder, and the word origins dictionary (links above) as needed. A new quiz is available each Monday through Thursday. This is the quiz for December 23.


One theory of how gunpowder came to Europe is that it made its way along the Silk Road from Asia through the Middle East. Another is that it was brought to Europe during the Mongol invasion. William of Rubruck, an ambassador to the Mongols in 1254-1255, is often named as a possible intermediary in the transmission of gunpowder know-how between the East and the West.

The earliest European reference to gunpowder is found in 1267. The oldest written recipes for gunpowder in Europe were recorded between 1280 and 1300.

In 1326, the earliest known European picture of a gun appeared. That same year, the Signoria of Florence appointed two officers to obtain metal cannons and ammunition for the town's defense.

A reference from 1331 describes an attack mounted by two Germanic knights using gunpowder weapons of some sort. The Battle of Crécy in 1346 was one of the first in Europe where cannons were used. In 1350, only four years later, Petrarch wrote that the presence of cannons on the battlefield was "as common and familiar as other kinds of arms."

1. The Silk Road was
A. a road between Italy and France.
B. a road between China and the Mediterranean.
C. a road between Germany and Spain.
D. a road between China and India.
2. The earliest European reference to gunpowder dates from
A. 1267.
B. 1280.
C. 1331.
D. 1350.
3. The Signoria was
A. the church authority.
B. the Vatican appointee.
C. the governing authority.
D. the building housing government offices.
4. The Battle of Crecy occurred in
A. France.
B. England.
C. Belgium.
D. Germany.


The information comes from Wikipedia.

Write down your answers and then see Answer Key below.


























Answer Key: 1-B..........2-A..........3-C..........4-A
Corrections? Questions? Comments? E-mail Robert Jackson at robert15115@gmail.com.