Reading Comprehension Quiz


[A new interlinear poem will be available each Monday: Weekly Interlinear Poem .]

Use the dictionary, the acronym finder, and the word origins dictionary (links above) as needed. A new quiz is available each Monday through Thursday. This is the quiz for August 7.


Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794) was the father of modern chemistry.

His researches included some of the first truly quantitative chemical experiments. He carefully weighed the reactants and products in a chemical reaction, taking thereby a crucial step in the advancement of chemistry. He showed that, although matter can change its state in a chemical reaction, the quantity of matter is the same at the end as at the beginning of every chemical change.

He investigated the composition of water and air, which at the time were considered to be elements. He determined that the components of water were oxygen and hydrogen and that air was a mixture of gases. With other French chemists, Lavoisier devised a systematic chemical nomenclature. This nomenclature facilitated communication of discoveries between chemists of different backgrounds. Still largely in use today, it includes names such as sulfuric acid, sulfates, and sulfites.

1. A reactant is
A. anything that reacts.
B. an unstable chemical.
C. an acid.
D. a chemical substance present at the start of a chemical reaction.
2. Lavoisier proved
A. the instability of matter.
B. the conservation of mass (matter).
C. that water is an element.
D. the similarity of water and air.
3. The Latin word origin of nomenclature meant
A. caller of names.
B. breaker of names.
C. list of names.
D. catalog of names.
4. An element in this context is
A. a feature of weather.
B. a substance that cannot be separated into simpler substances.
C. one's most natural place.
D. one of the four constituents of matter.


The information comes from Wikipedia.

Write down your answers and then see Answer Key below.


























Answer Key: 1-D..........2-B..........3-A..........4-B
Corrections? Questions? Comments? E-mail Robert Jackson at robert15115@gmail.com.